Year of faith
WE BELIEVE
Introduction
Background
Vatican II
Catechism of the Catholic Church
Conversion
Charity
New Evangelisation
Calendar

Mother Teresa

A Year of faith to:

keep our gaze fixed upon Jesus Christ, 

to renewed conversion,

to redicover,

to redicover and study,

to pray,

to reflect,

to arouse aspiration,

to celebrate,

to profess

to intensify the witness of charity,

to make our relationship with Christ the Lord increasingly firm.

 

.The Year of Faith, from this perspective, is a summons to an authentic and renewed conversion to the Lord, the one Saviour of the world. In the mystery of his death and resurrection, God has revealed in its fullness the Love that saves and calls us to conversion of life through the forgiveness of sins (cf. Acts 5:31).  

.the aspiration to profess the faith in fullness and with renewed conviction, with confidence and hope.

. It will also be a good opportunity to intensify the celebration of the faith in the liturgy, especially in the Eucharist,

which is “the summit towards which the activity of the Church is directed; ... and also the source from which all its power flows.”[14]

At the same time, we make it our prayer that believers’ witness of life may grow in credibility.

 

To rediscover the content of the faith that is professed, celebrated, lived and prayed,[15]

and to reflect on the act of faith,

is a task that every believer must make his own, especially in the course of this Year.

the Year of Faith will have to see a concerted effort to rediscover and study the fundamental content of the faith

that receives its systematic and organic synthesis in the Catechism of the Catholic Church.  

The Year of Faith will also be a good opportunity to intensify the witness of charity. As Saint Paul reminds us: “So faith, hope, love abide, these three; but the greatest of these is love” (1 Cor 13:13).

With even stronger words – which have always placed Christians under obligation – Saint James said: “What does it profit, my brethren, if a man says he has faith but has not works? Can his faith save him? If a brother or sister is ill-clad and in lack of daily food, and one of you says to them, ‘Go in peace, be warmed and filled’, without giving them the things needed for the body, what does it profit? So faith by itself, if it has no works, is dead. But some one will say, ‘You have faith and I have works.’ Show me your faith apart from your works, and I by my works will show you my faith” (Jas 2:14-18). 

may this Year of Faith make our relationship with Christ the Lord increasingly firm

since only in him is there the certitude for looking to the future and the guarantee of an authentic and lasting love. The words of Saint Peter shed one final ray of light on faith: “In this you rejoice, though now for a little while you may have to suffer various trials, so that the genuineness of your faith, more precious than gold which though perishable is tested by fire, may redound to praise and glory and honour at the revelation of Jesus Christ. Without having seen him you love him; though you do not now see him you believe in him and rejoice with unutterable and exalted joy. As the outcome of your faith you obtain the salvation of your souls” (1 Pet 1:6-9). The life of Christians knows the experience of joy as well as the experience of suffering. How many of the saints have lived in solitude! How many believers, even in our own day, are tested by God’s silence when they would rather hear his consoling voice! The trials of life, while helping us to understand the mystery of the Cross and to participate in the sufferings of Christ (cf. Col 1:24), are a prelude to the joy and hope to which faith leads: “when I am weak, then I am strong” (2 Cor 12:10). We believe with firm certitude that the Lord Jesus has conquered evil and death. With this sure confidence we entrust ourselves to him: he, present in our midst, overcomes the power of the evil one (cf. Lk 11:20); and the Church, the visible community of his mercy, abides in him as a sign of definitive reconciliation with the Father. 

During this time we will need to keep our gaze fixed upon Jesus Christ, the “pioneer and perfecter of our faith” (Heb 12:2): in him, all the anguish and all the longing of the human heart finds fulfilment.

The joy of love, the answer to the drama of suffering and pain, the power of forgiveness in the face of an offence received and the victory of life over the emptiness of death: all this finds fulfilment in the mystery of his Incarnation, in his becoming man, in his sharing our human weakness so as to transform it by the power of his resurrection. In him who died and rose again for our salvation, the examples of faith that have marked these two thousand years of our salvation history are brought into the fullness of light. 

Motu Proprio - Porta Fidei

His Holiness has issued an Apostolic Letter initiating the Year which states: "We want this Year to arouse in every believer the aspiration to profess the faith in fullness and with renewed conviction, with confidence and hope."
(Paragraph 9).

read the Motu Proprio: Porta Fidei

Did you know?

The first Motu Proprio was issued by Pope Innocent VIII in 1484*.
*The Catholic Encycopedia - New Advent

 

 

 

Downloads/Links

Prayer for the Year of Faith

Motu Proprio: Porta Fidei

Plenary Indulgence granted for Year of Faith

Fidei Depositum

The Catechism of the Catholic Church

The Bible

Homily on opening the door of faith - Cardinal Piacenza

Pope Announces "year of faith"

 

 

 

 

 

 

Official yearoffaith website of the Pontifical Council for Promoting the New Evangelization

 

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